NAIDOC Week 2017 – Our Languages Matter: Spotlight Information and Resources

11, July, 2017

11 June 2017

This year to celebrate NAIDOC week 2017 – Our Languages Matter the staff at Queensland Council of Social Service (QCOSS) researched the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages of Queensland – those still being used and those that have been lost. This was done to get a better understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as this nation’s first people.

QCOSS have shared their research by saying hello, good day and welcome in the many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages of Queensland in a recording.

QCOSS acknowledges that they have not been able to cover them all and may not have perfect pronunciation but please take this in the manner in which it is offered as an exploration and a way to get closer to understanding the first languages of Queensland.

For further information, visit the QCOSS website.

 

Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) Policy Timeline: Spotlight Information and Resources

8, July, 2017

11 June 2017

AODCK logo

The Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (AODKC) has developed an alcohol and other drugs (AOD) policy timeline designed to inform and educate the sector. The policy timeline provides an interactive way to learn about the history of AOD policies in Australia.

Users can use a simple drop down feature to view more information.

The AOD policy timeline provides a snap shot of policy in the sector and then allows for more detailed information for each listing and access to the report from the Knowledge Centre bibliography.

For more information, see the AODKC media release (opens in Word) or access the AOD policy timeline.

New eBook Teaches and Informs Alcohol and Other Drug Sector: Spotlight Information and Resources

23, June, 2017

23 June 2017

AODKC banner image

The Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre (AODKC) has launched a new eBook about illicit drug use. The interactive electronic version is a powerful learning tool and is based on the 2016 Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. 

The eBook has been created for Apple devices such as iPads, iPhones, laptops and desktop computers. It is free to download from iTunes and via the AODKC

Users can read it, listen to it, make notes and copy/paste content. Embedded in the eBook are short films and links to the original source of references. Once downloaded, the eBook can be accessed and used multiple times in any way that the user determines. In addition, you can also access from the AODKC site, a short an animated infographic of the eBook which provides another learning opportunity.

Illicit drug use is an issue of concern to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians. The purpose of the review is to provide a comprehensive synthesis of key information for people involved in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in Australia.

For further details, please see the AODKC media release.

 

*Information sourced from Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet  and AODKC.

Report of the Disability Housing Futures Working Group: Stage 1, 2017: Spotlight Information and Resources

13, June, 2017

13 June 2017

Disability Housing Futures Working Group logo

 

The Disability Housing Futures Working Group has released its latest report, People with Disability Living in Inadequate Housing: Prevalence, Trends, and Health and Workforce Participation Outcomes for stage 1, 2017.

This report analyses trends from the Housing, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey to create a national picture of the unmet housing need experienced by people with disability. Importantly, this analysis demonstrates both the rise of inadequate housing for people with disability and its impact on their health and workforce participation.

For further details, see the report cover letter and the Disability Housing Futures Working Group April 2017 Report.

List of Independent Patient Rights Advisors: Spotlight Information and Resources Issue 12

22, May, 2017

The Mental Health and Other Drugs Branch of the Department of Health has developed a list of Independent Patient Rights Advisors (IPRA) within the Hospital and Heath Services. This list is current as of May 2017.

Download the list of Independent Patient Rights Advisors within the Hospital and Heath Services.

National Social Housing Survey: Summary of National Results 2016: Spotlight News Issue 11

9, May, 2017

Image: National Social Housing Survey

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has released the summary of national results for the 2016 National Social Housing Survey (NSHS). The NSHS sampled tenants in public housing, community housing and state owned and managed Indigenous housing (SOMIH) between April and June 2016.

The results revealed that:

  • around 1 in 3 social housing households included at least 1 member with disability
  • all social housing programs used health and medical services most frequently, followed by mental health services.

For further information, read the National Social Housing Survey: Summary of National Results 2016.

Refugee Health and Wellbeing Policy and Action Plan: Spotlight Information and Resources Issue 11

9, May, 2017

Image - Refugee Health and Welfare paper

The Refugee Health and Wellbeing: A Policy and Action Plan for Queensland 2017 – 2020  has been officially launched. This policy and action plan aims to:

  • Facilitate a state-wide, system-wide and action-oriented approach to improving the health and wellbeing of people from refugee backgrounds in Queensland
  • Give practical guidance around identified priority areas for action that will increase access to timely, high quality and culturally responsive healthcare services.

 

Read the Refugee Health and Wellbeing: A Policy and Action Plan for Queensland 2017 – 2020.

Refugee Health Network of Queensland, which aims to ‘be a mechanism to build capacity, partnerships, and facilitate coordination of care across health, settlement agencies, communities, government and non-government sectors’ has also been launched. To find out more about the network, visit the Refugee Health Network of Queensland website.